Die iDSB unterwegs: Economics in Frankfurt

From the 19th to the 22nd of October, our Economics class, consisting of seven students and our teacher, Ms Hennig, went on an excursion to Frankfurt. Our goal was to visit the Bundesbank and the European Central Bank in order to get more information about our current topic of macroeconomics, but also to learn more about Frankfurt and German culture in general.

On Thursday, the day of our departure, we left Gare du Midi on train at 08:24. The journey was made endurable by a game of cards.

We arrived in Frankfurt at about 11:30, and we arranged ourselves at the A&O Hostel in Galluswarte, before exploring the most important locations in Frankfurt, and there were a lot of these. We visited historical monuments, such as the Paulskirche, in which the first national assembly was held. The Goethehaus was another one of these historical monuments, that we saw on our trip through the city. Moreover, we tried to bring the bridge “Eiserner Steg” to collapse, by jumping at the same time. Luckily, we did not achieve this. We took place in an arts project, by letting someone take a photo of us with a strange person.

Furthermore, we visited the town hall, in front of which we found a traditional restaurant, where we took our first meal. The food we enjoyed in Frankfurt was pretty international during the following days, with Indian, Italian and American cuisine. Rounding up our cultural enrichment, was the play Pygmalion, by George Bernard Shaw and Tchaikovsky’s opera Eugen Onegin. 

Now we come to the most important part of our trip, well for our class at least, the economic part. Our first contact with economics was when we climbed on the bear and the bull in front of the stock exchange. The class went to the Bundesbank on Friday, where we listened to a presentation and visited the Geldmuseum shortly after. The whole group got to touch a real gold bar, worth 440000 Euros.

We visited the ECB the same day, where our class and other visitors got to listen to another presentation, and walk through an exhibition, with a recreation of the governing council’s conference room.

The last day, we were given a lot of free time, to further stroll around the city or to simply enjoy the fantastic view of Frankfurt’s skyline. The only planned activity was a visit to the Museum of Modern Arts, in which many inspiring but also weird art pieces were shown. 

The class returned home on Sunday, and most of us used the travel time in the train, to learn for our math exam.

Overall it was a very informative, cultural and enjoyable excursion.

Nicolas Reimann de la Cruz